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Thread: Finishing Plunge Cuts on the Grinder (How I do it)

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Canyon, TX
    Posts
    275
    Thanks Ed! Keep them coming! We appreciate the how to's!!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Great Falls, Montana, USA
    Posts
    2,639
    John:
    I would not recommend trying that technique with trizact or any other structured abrasive belts.....at best the grit is going to come off, and at worst you will be wearing shards of a wrecked belt.....either way its not something you want to do.

    Here's the belts I currently use, in order of grit size....

    - 50 grit= VSM XK760X ("X" weight)
    - 120 grit= VSM XK760X ("X" weight)
    -220 grit= Klingspor LS309 ("J" weight)
    -400 grit= Klingspor LS309 ("J" weight)
    -600 grit= Klingspor KL361 J-flex ("J" weight)
    800 and 1200: I stil haven't settled on what I like the best, but am currently using Hermes RB346M in 800, and Deerfos "padded back" in 1200. Once I get past 400 grit, I've still not found a belt with all the qualities that would make me stick with a specific type/brand.

    I also have various types of other belts in the shop, but they are all here for very specific purposes/reasons....they work very well under specific circumstances, but not so well when you step outside those parameters.

    Its very rare that I use a 120 grit belt during finish grinding. I grind to nearly finished with a 50 grit, then jump straight to a 400. When rolled over the edge of the platen as I did in the video, the 400 will clean up and put a radius on the plunges. In some cases, I will use a 220 between the 50 and 400.....but thats an exeption for me, rather then a rule. Something you have to realize is that with each successive finer grit, it takes more patience. As you progress to finer grits and lighter weight backings, belts will grind flatter and truer. For example when using a the 40-60 grit belts, they cut very aggresivley, but do not produce a very flat surface. That means when you go to...say a 220....you have to allow that belt "cut" its way to a truer flat, or if hollow grinding, to a hollow that matches that belt's grit and backing thickness.

    While I do clean up the plunges with 600, once I'm finished with 400 on the grinder, I generally go to finer grits on the disc sander.....simply because I have specific type/brands of finer grit sheets that I like (in this case I use RynoWet Redline sheets from Supergrit)

    While some makers have the skills to completely finish a blade on the grinder, I'm just not one of them. I can do all the motions, but I'm just not happy with the way the finish looks. Personally, I believe that there is nothing that adds more to a knife then taking the time and effort to hand finish.....its just a look and intrinsic value that can't be had any other way. I also like a look where the blade is "blended", meaning that I don't particulary care for horizontal grind lines on a blade, which is why I mentioned that in the video....but thats just me. Each maker will blend his/her skills and likes into what looks best to them. As I tell anyone who comes to my shop for classes..... My way isn't necessarily the "right" way, and by no means is it the only way.....it's just Ed Caffrey's way. I spent a lot of years stubling around before I realized that, and if there is a method I use that can help someone, I'm more then happy to share it.

    www.caffreyknives.net
    Caffreyknives@Gmail.com

    "Nobody cares what you know.....until they know you care."
    Visit me at Table 2Q at the Blade Show!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    314
    Quote Originally Posted by EdCaffreyMS View Post
    John:
    I would not recommend trying that technique with trizact or any other structured abrasive belts.....at best the grit is going to come off, and at worst you will be wearing shards of a wrecked belt.....either way its not something you want to do.

    Here's the belts I currently use, in order of grit size....

    - 50 grit= VSM XK760X ("X" weight)
    - 120 grit= VSM XK760X ("X" weight)
    -220 grit= Klingspor LS309 ("J" weight)
    -400 grit= Klingspor LS309 ("J" weight)
    -600 grit= Klingspor KL361 J-flex ("J" weight)
    800 and 1200: I stil haven't settled on what I like the best, but am currently using Hermes RB346M in 800, and Deerfos "padded back" in 1200. Once I get past 400 grit, I've still not found a belt with all the qualities that would make me stick with a specific type/brand.

    I also have various types of other belts in the shop, but they are all here for very specific purposes/reasons....they work very well under specific circumstances, but not so well when you step outside those parameters.



    Its very rare that I use a 120 grit belt during finish grinding. I grind to nearly finished with a 50 grit, then jump straight to a 400. When rolled over the edge of the platen as I did in the video, the 400 will clean up and put a radius on the plunges. In some cases, I will use a 220 between the 50 and 400.....but thats an exeption for me, rather then a rule. Something you have to realize is that with each successive finer grit, it takes more patience. As you progress to finer grits and lighter weight backings, belts will grind flatter and truer. For example when using a the 40-60 grit belts, they cut very aggresivley, but do not produce a very flat surface. That means when you go to...say a 220....you have to allow that belt "cut" its way to a truer flat, or if hollow grinding, to a hollow that matches that belt's grit and backing thickness.

    While I do clean up the plunges with 600, once I'm finished with 400 on the grinder, I generally go to finer grits on the disc sander.....simply because I have specific type/brands of finer grit sheets that I like (in this case I use RynoWet Redline sheets from Supergrit)

    While some makers have the skills to completely finish a blade on the grinder, I'm just not one of them. I can do all the motions, but I'm just not happy with the way the finish looks. Personally, I believe that there is nothing that adds more to a knife then taking the time and effort to hand finish.....its just a look and intrinsic value that can't be had any other way. I also like a look where the blade is "blended", meaning that I don't particulary care for horizontal grind lines on a blade, which is why I mentioned that in the video....but thats just me. Each maker will blend his/her skills and likes into what looks best to them. As I tell anyone who comes to my shop for classes..... My way isn't necessarily the "right" way, and by no means is it the only way.....it's just Ed Caffrey's way. I spent a lot of years stubling around before I realized that, and if there is a method I use that can help someone, I'm more then happy to share it.
    Ed,

    I want to thank you for taking the time to give me such a well thought out and detailed response. I'm going to order these belts and give them a shot. As well as the process you mentioned.

    John

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