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View Full Version : What do you folks use to seal your handle scales?



J S Machine
06-09-2010, 12:46 PM
I'm not sure how to do this or if it should even be done. The few knives I've made have stabilized wood for handles. I don't know if it needs to be left the way it is or if it should be sealed somehow.

If you guys seal your knives, what process do you use to get them to where they are ready to go and what products do you use? Also, does the process change with bone / ivory as opposed to wood?

HHH Knives
06-09-2010, 01:23 PM
J S, Hello.
Thats a good question, :confused:

Most stabilized woods dont need any xtra sealing.. as they are "stabilized". If you know the company that did the stabilization on the wood, It couldnt hurt to ask them what they believe is the best way to finish or seal there product.;)

All stabilized woods are a bit different, depending on the type of wood and the type of polymer used to do the stabilization, etc.... But as a rule, I you can use a buffer with white rouge to bring out a shine and a smooth finish. Sometimes I apply a good wax for a seal coat.

I dont use alot of bone. do hopefully some one else will see the thread and be able to help ya out..

Good topic..

God Bless YA!!

John Barker
06-10-2010, 01:15 PM
I sand to 600 grit and coat twice with Danish Oil.
-John

EdCaffreyMS
06-11-2010, 08:48 AM
Much depends on the specific handle material. Some of the exotic woods work best if you DO NOT seal them. Some of them you simply can't because of the natural oils/resins in the wood. Woods such as rosewood, cocobolo, African Blackwood, desert ironwood etc, only receive a good coat of wax after they are finished.
Porous woods such as Koa, Maple, etc (non-stabilized) receive several coats of Tru-Oil or Lin-Speed in my shop.

Stabilized woods required no sealer, and will generally look nasty if you apply one. Finish these materials down finely (I got to 600-800) buff lightly with pink no-scratch, and then wax.


Ivories and other exotics can be tricky....my recommendation, especially for ivories is to sand them to a very fine finish (I got to at least 1200) then lightly buff and wax. IVORIES, PEARL, AND LIKE MATERIALS ARE VERY SUSCEPTIBLE TO HEAT! If these material get warm while grinding or finishing, it creates all kinds of problems. Be careful!

Finally, anything that is a natural material is going to "move"....even stabilized materials. Some folks might argue, but if you pay close attention, even stabilized material with shrink/expand a LITTLE. That is natural. Natural handle materials that are allowed to "breathe", in other words, not slathered in finishes or sealers, will have less problems, and look better for longer over the life span of a knife.

Gary Miller
06-28-2010, 10:28 PM
I use Tru-oil on most woods and Thompson water seal on stag. the water seal realiy brings out the color in the antler.

BossDog
06-28-2010, 10:56 PM
I like Deft Danish Oil which is mostly tung oil with evaporants to help it dry quicker. I put it on everything. It really makes stuff pop...then I wax and buff...

Ernie Swanson
06-29-2010, 05:43 AM
I like Deft Danish Oil which is mostly tung oil with evaporants to help it dry quicker. I put it on everything. It really makes stuff pop...then I wax and buff...

Do you put it on them pizzas you make, how about eggs?:D:p

Sampson knifeworks
06-29-2010, 09:49 AM
Hello,
I agree with most of the posts on this thread! I have used stabilized woods for many years and used woods from all the top stabilizers. After having this stuff shrink, warp and do all the stuff it's not supposed to do, I seal everything with Formby's tung oil or tru-oil from birchwood casey. I have had great success sealing stabilized woods! I sand to a 600 grit then oil, two coats with a final rub down with 3M grey polishing paper, then wax. The trick is to remove the oil from the surface and seal the wood. This method works for me cause I like the hand rubbed finish, on blades and handles. Buffer does not get used much in my shop. Thanks for hearing my two cents!
Sampson Knifeworks

Ernie Swanson
06-29-2010, 05:30 PM
I like Deft Danish Oil which is mostly tung oil with evaporants to help it dry quicker. I put it on everything. It really makes stuff pop...then I wax and buff...

I am going to have to look for the Deft Danish Oil, I like the sounds of it drying a bit quicker.


Also I was wondering what kinds of wax you all use on your handles?

Sampson knifeworks
07-04-2010, 09:17 AM
Hi Ernie,
I like to use Renaissance wax on wood & steel, It's quality stuff! I also like birchwood caseys gun stock wax, easy to find where they sell gun supplies.
Take care,
Sampson Knifeworks

mosto
07-07-2010, 02:12 AM
It's also worth to try Boiled Linseed Oil.
I used also sometimes as quick protective on carbon blades