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Eli Gautreaux
03-09-2010, 07:06 PM
Hey Ray,

I finally got the forge lit up this weekend. Found an old lawn mower blade (John Deer for the afficionados, lol) and went to whacking. I had to use the grinder to clean up the profile, but hammer only for the bevels. Any idea what the steel might be? I'll try to find a pig and see if it holds an edge...

7 1/4 overall, 2" wide at the belly (barely got it through the little openning in the forge.) Bocote scales.


http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i138/xamaneli/100_4774.jpg


http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i138/xamaneli/100_4775.jpg

Jeff Pearce
03-09-2010, 07:12 PM
Looks like it will take care of business ...2thumbs

Raymond Richard
03-09-2010, 07:44 PM
Eli, Your guess could be as good as mine. I do know that John Deer has there own special make of 5160 but don't know if they use it for the lawn mower blades. I've got a brush hog blade from a JD and I'm pretty sure its 5160. The blade looks like it got hard to me. You need to test it out.

Eli Gautreaux
03-09-2010, 08:04 PM
I'll give it a try. It definitely got hard, in oil this time, no more of that dangerous anitfreeze 2guns

stabber
03-09-2010, 08:14 PM
:eek:Auh Oh!! I hear them John Deer Blades are softer then Baby poo. Best send it to me for testin Buddy!!:D

Nice job Eli!! Keep it up.

P.S. Is this one Redneck Forge?2thumbs

Eli Gautreaux
03-09-2010, 08:34 PM
:eek:Auh Oh!! I hear them John Deer Blades are softer then Baby poo. Best send it to me for testin Buddy!!:D

Nice job Eli!! Keep it up.

P.S. Is this one Redneck Forge?2thumbs


Thanks Ricky, and yes, everyone I forge is Redneck :bud:

stabber
03-09-2010, 08:48 PM
:eek:yea!

Peter Killgore
03-09-2010, 09:06 PM
You might be a Redneck if you've ever been to drunk to fish! :D

The knife looks good Eli! Hope your not allergic to Bocote.

How are you liking that NWG?

RAGUEL3
03-09-2010, 10:18 PM
From the Deeres Mouth as it were;

John Deere mower blades are made of abrasion-resistant, high-carbon, nickel-alloy steel. This steel (commonly used for automotive leaf springs) ** Im betting on their prefferred/perfected 5160**
has the hardness to be extremely resistant to wear and breakage. Unlike the lower-carbon blades used by many manufacturers, John Deere blades will withstand sand, stones, or other hard objects with little cracking or chipping. The result is a better cutting job and longer blade life.

Precision manufacturing process

In providing a quality blade, the attention given to the manufacturing process is as important as using high-quality material. John Deere mower blades are precision manufactured. The process includes:

The blades are precision milled at each end for a smooth, sharp cutting surface.

They are then induction heated to 1600F. This gives them a consistent hardness.

Next they are “plastic quenched.” This process of dipping and cooling the blade in a special solution ensures that the hardness attained during heat treating is not lost.

The next process is to draw and temper the blades in an oven to reduce brittleness and increase toughness. This further decreases the chance of the blade edges cracking or chipping.

All John Deere blades have a Rockwell Hardness of 40-C to 45-C. Hardness below 40-C results in a surface that is too soft. Hardness over 45-C makes the blade too brittle.

The blades are then flattened to ensure they are perfectly straight and balanced to permit a smoother cut.

Finally the blades are inspected to be sure they meet rigid quality control standards. This ensures that only the best mower blades are used.

Eli Gautreaux
03-10-2010, 05:20 AM
Thanks Raguel3, that's exactly what I needed to know.

Man, they sound like super steel. Maybe I should've just threw a handle on it and left it at 45 rc :D

Wayne Coe
03-10-2010, 06:28 AM
Stabber, that is the best Knife Dogs avatar I have seen yet. Glad to see that he is standing up straight and is using a European style anvil.2thumbs

Raymond Richard
03-10-2010, 08:14 AM
From the Deeres Mouth as it were;

John Deere mower blades are made of abrasion-resistant, high-carbon, nickel-alloy steel. This steel (commonly used for automotive leaf springs) ** Im betting on their prefferred/perfected 5160**
has the hardness to be extremely resistant to wear and breakage. Unlike the lower-carbon blades used by many manufacturers, John Deere blades will withstand sand, stones, or other hard objects with little cracking or chipping. The result is a better cutting job and longer blade life.

Precision manufacturing process

In providing a quality blade, the attention given to the manufacturing process is as important as using high-quality material. John Deere mower blades are precision manufactured. The process includes:

The blades are precision milled at each end for a smooth, sharp cutting surface.

They are then induction heated to 1600F. This gives them a consistent hardness.

Next they are “plastic quenched.” This process of dipping and cooling the blade in a special solution ensures that the hardness attained during heat treating is not lost.

The next process is to draw and temper the blades in an oven to reduce brittleness and increase toughness. This further decreases the chance of the blade edges cracking or chipping.

All John Deere blades have a Rockwell Hardness of 40-C to 45-C. Hardness below 40-C results in a surface that is too soft. Hardness over 45-C makes the blade too brittle.

The blades are then flattened to ensure they are perfectly straight and balanced to permit a smoother cut.

Finally the blades are inspected to be sure they meet rigid quality control standards. This ensures that only the best mower blades are used.

This helps explain why I can't afford one of there riding mowers. :D One of the things I lost when I burnt my shop and barn down in 2005 was my economy riding mower. I replaced my loss with a name brand this time but the Deer was still twice as expensive. The first time I used my new name brand mower I hit a hidden mole mound and bent the blade so bad I ended up replacing it. I asked the fellow at the parts place if they had a stronger blade and he told me they were available at twice the cost so I went with the cheaper blade. He also told me with the better blades the chances of destroying a more expensive part on the mower also went up.

Eli Gautreaux
03-10-2010, 08:29 AM
This helps explain why I can't afford one of there riding mowers. :D One of the things I lost when I burnt my shop and barn in 2005 was my economy riding mower. I replaced my loss with a name brand this time but the Deer was still twice as expensive. The first time I used my new name brand mower I hit a hidden mole mound and bent the blade so bad I ended up replacing it. I asked the fellow at the parts place if they had a stronger blade and he told me they were available at twice the cost so I went with the cheaper blade. He also told me with the better blades the chances of destroying a more expensive part on the mower also went up.


Now that is funny! Does that mean if I buy one of Tai's fancy hammers, the chances of destroying my shoulder or wrist goes way up??? :D

Raymond Richard
03-10-2010, 09:18 AM
Now that is funny! Does that mean if I buy one of Tai's fancy hammers, the chances of destroying my shoulder or wrist goes way up??? :D

Eli, This all depends on which make you are. Now you remind more of a John Deer so using one of Tai's hammers would probably prolong the life of the two joints you mentioned. :D

RAGUEL3
03-10-2010, 11:40 AM
Im gonna hang it out there and say its about a lock that they use the same premium blend 5160 that they have strict standards on.
The test they use for the batches of blades is , they run several random ones up close to 200 mph,and then introduce a 1 inch round steel stake to simulate an unseen ubstruction,..
The blade has to BEND when it strikes, if it cracks or breaks, =garbage can.
I think your blade will be fine,lol.

RAGUEL3
03-10-2010, 11:46 AM
"This helps explain why I can't afford one of there riding mowers. "-- RR

Probably so Mr R,lol. But for ONCE I can say you get what you pay for.
I have one of the larger yard tractor style mowers from Deere, and the lil woman caught a wire hanging in yard in blades two years ago- it wound up over 40 ft ( stripped it right off the fence)and chopped it to h*ll n back before stalling.lolol took blades off, unwound the rest,and presto, cranked right up.,..blades?, few small dings, ground them out on the grizz and good as new.

Eli Gautreaux
03-10-2010, 09:23 PM
I got another one today,a John Deer blade that is...

I also got some chain saw steel (the bar),any idea what that is??? :D

Raymond Richard
03-10-2010, 09:28 PM
I got another one today,a John Deer blade that is...

I also got some chain saw steel (the bar),any idea what that is??? :D

Eli, If you know who made the bar try contacting them and ask.

Peter Killgore
03-10-2010, 10:48 PM
I got another one today,a John Deer blade that is...

I also got some chain saw steel (the bar),any idea what that is??? :D

Eli, I used a chainsaw bar on my first bowie(the one in my avatar). It's an Oregon brand bar and all I could find on it was that it is a chrome-moly steel. My guess is it's 4140(Ray called in NI steel meaning "No Idea"). I did a few knives out of 4130 and the chainsaw bar seemed to work quite similarly to that. I haven't really tested that blade all that much but I did chop into a 2x4 with it. I didn't go through it but the edge held up fairly well for the two or three chops I took with it. It is flexible so it does ok for a large knife(the blade on mine is 9 inches) but I wouldn't use it for a small knife where you want a really good edge retention. If you decide to use it, let us know how it holds up. I think I still have a few bars lying around in the shop....somewhere....

Martin Brandt
03-10-2010, 11:07 PM
Eli, If my memory still works, the Oregon bars are 1050. The others probably similar steel.

Eli Gautreaux
04-01-2010, 11:26 AM
Finally got this little guy sheathed:


http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i138/xamaneli/100_4776.jpg


http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i138/xamaneli/100_4778.jpg


http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i138/xamaneli/100_4782.jpg


And I made one more for a friend of mine, he actually did a lot of the forging:

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i138/xamaneli/Johnnysknife.jpg

Rock
04-01-2010, 11:32 AM
Knice stuff! I like the woodstain look on the leather sheath. Very appealing.

Raymond Richard
04-01-2010, 12:14 PM
Eli, All and all that's one fine looking package! Looks like a budding sheath maker in bloom also.

Peter Killgore
04-01-2010, 10:01 PM
Wow! That(to my eye at least) is an excellent sheath! I like that style of knife too. Looks like it would make a very fine skinner.

Eli Gautreaux
04-02-2010, 09:46 AM
Thanks Peter. I've been playing with leather for a while, until Ray diverted my interests with a forge and an anvil :D

It feels good to bend a little leather again. I kind of think that eventualy I'll be a fair weather knifemaker ---- forging in the winter, grinding and leather in the summer...

RAGUEL3
04-02-2010, 11:23 AM
nice stuff bud

Raymond Richard
04-02-2010, 12:04 PM
Thanks Peter. I've been playing with leather for a while, until Ray diverted my interests with a forge and an anvil :D

It feels good to bend a little leather again. I kind of think that eventualy I'll be a fair weather knifemaker ---- forging in the winter, grinding and leather in the summer...

Eli, I'm trying to remember twisting your arm about forging. :D

Fair weather knifemaker goes hand and hand with the red hair. I could use a little warmth today. I must be a fair weather knifemaker also. 2thumbs

Eli Gautreaux
04-02-2010, 02:09 PM
No arm twisting required!

Ray, remember when you told me to set the anvil in concrete???

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i138/xamaneli/concreteforge.jpg

mofretwell
04-02-2010, 02:20 PM
Eli, that picture is downright funny. Are you sure you didn't get the idea from Jeff Foxworthy?

Raymond Richard
04-02-2010, 04:10 PM
Eli, that picture is downright funny. Are you sure you didn't get the idea from Jeff Foxworthy?

Marvin, You got to remember Eli is from Texas. They are a bit different. :D

Eli Gautreaux
04-02-2010, 08:31 PM
LOL... I got 4 bags of crete and we were going to set it in a "box" with wheels so you could kick it up like a dolly, but ran out of time. Besides, I have to keep it mobile for next fall when you visit :D