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Peter Killgore
12-23-2009, 11:57 AM
I just got this knife finished yesterday. It's for a good friend from my church who's wife is buying it as a Surprise Christmas gift for him. The blade is clay quenched 1095. The fittings are wrought iron and the handle is Cocobolo.
http://knifedogs.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=4379&d=1261594566

http://knifedogs.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=4378&d=1261594566
I wish I could say this knife was forged but it wasn't. I did get to do it on my new NWG though!!2thumbs This is actually the second blade I had to do since the first one came out of hardening looking somewhat like a potato chip:mad:

All comments/critique are very welcome.

Peter

Raymond Richard
12-23-2009, 02:05 PM
Looks good! I bet your shop was nice and warm this morning. Lots of frost here earlier.

Peter Killgore
12-23-2009, 03:10 PM
Thanks Ray! We had a fair amount of frost here too and light snow the past two days. I wish the shop had been warm this morning. I just came in and I can't feel my toes. :D And I though I didn't like making sheaths when it's warm!! As you can see in the picture, there's still frost on the ground.

Raymond Richard
12-23-2009, 03:53 PM
Thanks Ray! We had a fair amount of frost here too and light snow the past two days. I wish the shop had been warm this morning. I just came in and I can't feel my toes. :D And I though I didn't like making sheaths when it's warm!! As you can see in the picture, there's still frost on the ground.

Looks like your dirt has gotten so hard it turned into stone from the cold. :D

Eli Gautreaux
12-23-2009, 06:30 PM
Nice work Peter, I love that blade shape, looks like a Ray inspired point 2thumbs

Raymond Richard
12-24-2009, 12:00 PM
Peter, The only suggestion I will make is the handle needs to be in line with the spine. Its sitting a little bit high the way it is.

Peter Killgore
12-24-2009, 12:37 PM
Peter, The only suggestion I will make is the handle needs to be in line with the spine. Its sitting a little bit high the way it is.

Thanks Ray! I'll keep that in mind on my next knife.(hopefully a forged one2thumbs) I have two knives and a spear sitting on my bench. Now I just need the time to finish them. :rolleyes:

Peter Killgore
12-26-2009, 04:05 PM
Here's another that I finished for Christmas. I didn't get pictures until today since it was under the tree
http://knifedogs.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=4442&d=1261868648

Also 1095 stock removal, clay quenched. The handle is Birdseye maple

Eli Gautreaux
12-27-2009, 07:03 AM
Here's another that I finished for Christmas. I didn't get pictures until today since it was under the tree
http://knifedogs.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=4442&d=1261868648

Also 1095 stock removal, clay quenched. The handle is Birdseye maple


Peter, was that a gift for family? I'm sure someone was pleased!

BTW, I put those plans to work, got most of the frame together now, but have to locate some 1.75 steel...

stabber
12-27-2009, 07:20 AM
Lookin good Peter

Phil Dwyer
12-27-2009, 12:42 PM
Nice looking knives Peter.

Quick question for you guys. In a case like this, could a person grind/file down the top of the length of the handle until it was flushed up with the spine? Maybe even take more material off at the ends leaving the center a little humpbacked? I guess an approach like this it would leave the handle too skinny though?

All the best, Phil

Peter Killgore
12-27-2009, 12:53 PM
Peter, was that a gift for family? I'm sure someone was pleased!

BTW, I put those plans to work, got most of the frame together now, but have to locate some 1.75 steel...

My brother got the knife for Christmas. I'm slowly outfitting my family and friends with my knives:D.

On the plans, is that 1.75" stock for the support columns? If it is, we couldn't find any so we used 1.5". It works just fine! I don't know why it says to use 1.75". I don't think they even carried that size tube at any of our local steel suppliers. If you can't find any 1.75" just go with 1.5". You shouldn't have any problems.

Peter Killgore
12-27-2009, 01:06 PM
Nice looking knives Peter.

Quick question for you guys. In a case like this, could a person grind/file down the top of the length of the handle until it was flushed up with the spine? Maybe even take more material off at the ends leaving the center a little humpbacked? I guess an approach like this it would leave the handle too skinny though?

All the best, Phil

Thanks for the compliment!

I should maybe leave it up to Ray to answer your question(he answers all of mine) but I'll give it a shot. As long as your tang slot is narrow enough that you can remove that material without exposing your slot in the handle, I think you could. Something I do is trace the tang onto my handle so I know where that slot is. What do you say Ray? Is this right?

Raymond Richard
12-27-2009, 04:36 PM
Nice looking knives Peter.

Quick question for you guys. In a case like this, could a person grind/file down the top of the length of the handle until it was flushed up with the spine? Maybe even take more material off at the ends leaving the center a little humpbacked? I guess an approach like this it would leave the handle too skinny though?

All the best, Phil

Hey FP, What your suggesting could be done if there were enough material above the spine. Looking at the pictures of Peter's knife it looks like he had the width right on the handle but the slot for the spine was off causing the handle to raise up.

Peter did you thread the end of the tang and use a nut to hold things together? You need to come over when it warms up and have me show you how I do a handle.

Peter Killgore
12-27-2009, 04:46 PM
Hey FP, What your suggesting could be done if there were enough material above the spine. Looking at the pictures of Peter's knife it looks like he had the width right on the handle but the slot for the spine was off causing the handle to raise up.

Peter did you thread the end of the tang and use a nut to hold things together? You need to come over when it warms up and have me show you how I do a handle.

Ray, I did thread the end of the tang. The little fitting with the ring is the "nut" that's holding it together(apart from the epoxy) . I used a real nut when the epoxy was curing so I could get it really tight for the set up and then that guy went on after the epoxy had cured.

When it warms up eh? Sounds good!2thumbs

Raymond Richard
12-27-2009, 08:06 PM
Ray, I did thread the end of the tang. The little fitting with the ring is the "nut" that's holding it together(apart from the epoxy) . I used a real nut when the epoxy was curing so I could get it really tight for the set up and then that guy went on after the epoxy had cured.

When it warms up eh? Sounds good!2thumbs

Peter, Did you have the fittings and handle done before you epoxied it together or did you do the shaping of the fitting and the handle after the epoxy had set up?

Peter Killgore
12-27-2009, 08:18 PM
Yes, I had the fittings and handle done before I epoxied it together. Is that the right way to do it?

Raymond Richard
12-28-2009, 09:48 AM
Yes, I had the fittings and handle done before I epoxied it together. Is that the right way to do it?

That's the way I do it. Peter you should have taken a picture of the knife before you epoxied it. Sometimes a picture is the best way to see a mistake especially if it is taken before the epoxy. Lots of times you just need to adjust joints very slightly to get the flow your after.

Peter Killgore
12-28-2009, 03:47 PM
I never really thought of doing that but it makes sense now that you say it. I'll do that on my next knife. Thanks Ray.