PDA

View Full Version : Drilling HT Blade



jcullen
07-01-2010, 11:11 AM
I need to enlarge holes in a blade that has been heat treated already,what do I need?, It laughs at HSS bits........

Deltashooter
07-01-2010, 11:19 AM
Where are the holes located ?

Bill Coye
07-01-2010, 11:19 AM
John, I think carbide drill bit and a slow drill speed are going to be the way to go.

2thumbs

Precision Plus
07-01-2010, 12:12 PM
Yes carbide will be the only way you will be able to touch it. How much material due you need to remove? Are the holes tapered, one side bigger then the other like draft from waterjet cutting, if so make sure you drill from the smaller side to the larger especially if only a small amount of material is being removed.

Travis,

jcullen
07-01-2010, 05:13 PM
Need to go out to 1/4 from 3/16, want to use SS connectors For the scales

Mr. Bad Example
07-02-2010, 04:59 PM
A carbide cutter in a Dremel-type tool would probably hog it out, if you don't care about it being exactly round.

Duncan Tipton
07-02-2010, 07:25 PM
Use an abrasive stone (Aluminum oxide) in your Dremel.

Byron
07-02-2010, 11:20 PM
Carbide is the way to go unless you want to use more expensive diamond abrasives. Semi high speed, slow feed, plenty of cutting fluid, and rigidity is needed. You can get by with a high speed hand drill if your extremely steady though..but I wouldn't recommend it as just a slight movement can potentially break them.

redman8066
07-23-2010, 10:13 PM
A carbide cutter in a Dremel-type tool would probably hog it out, if you don't care about it being exactly round.

this is what i do, and it takes about 5 min.!!

here is the bit:
http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?partNumber=73390-353-9901-03&langId=-1&storeId=10151&productId=1209475&catalogId=10051&cmRelshp=sim&rel=nofollow&cId=PDIO1

CTaylorJr
07-24-2010, 08:13 PM
Carbide is the way to go unless you want to use more expensive diamond abrasives. Semi high speed, slow feed, plenty of cutting fluid, and rigidity is needed. You can get by with a high speed hand drill if your extremely steady though..but I wouldn't recommend it as just a slight movement can potentially break them.

+1 on that info.

Also, make sure you use a vise, the carbide tipped bits like to grab and can toss and spin things around on short notice.

Charlie

Dan Keffeler
07-31-2010, 11:36 AM
13424The best way to do this is go to a local hardware store and get Tungsten Carbide Glass Drill Bit. you can get them in 1/4". The bit should be between 5 and $10. Go slow with good lube.
I have used these to drill through heat treaded CPM M4 and S30V.

Cliff Fendley
07-31-2010, 01:53 PM
I've got a set of these Rodman multipurpose bits and used them on hardened D2, 440C, and ATS34 many times. You've got to turn them super fast and they will grind their way through.
http://www.rodmanandcoinc.com/rodmanandcoinc.com/item04c5-2.html?UCIDs=1307321|1307323&PRID=1492961

Jim Adams Customs
10-13-2010, 10:28 PM
Carbide drills work great. I use them and carbide reamers. I have even thought of drilling and reaming my blades after heat treat.

Pinoy Knife
10-16-2010, 11:15 AM
Try using a solid carbide Burr.. a round nose one i have done that before ,as long as you have a hole that is close to size it will work pretty well.. im sure you can find a burr like that pretty much anywhere .

Richard
11-06-2010, 10:53 PM
Yea, what they said only you want to advance the carbide bit quickly. Heat is the enemy of carbide and your steel blade. If you cut slow you will build up too much heat. My drill bit Mfg. suggested that I run my bits up to 1/4" at 1000rpm and press pretty hard to get the bit through the material. Do not try this without clamping it securely. It will eat your lunch.

Todd Robbins
11-10-2010, 10:17 AM
What is the steel? Is it just the blade, or are the scales already glued in place awaiting pins?